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Financial incentives for new nursing faculty

Health Factors: Access to Care
Decision Makers: Educators State Government Federal Government Healthcare Professionals & Advocates
Evidence Rating: Expert Opinion
Population Reach: 10-19% of WI's population
Impact on Disparities: No impact on disparities likely

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Description

Financial incentive programs offer scholarships, loan repayment or loan forgiveness in exchange for a teaching commitment, or more competitive salaries for nursing graduate students who choose to pursue careers as nursing faculty. Programs can be initiated by the public sector, philanthropic groups, academic institutions, and the health care industry (Allan 2008). As of 2014-15, nursing schools report needing over 1,000 additional faculty to meet student demand (Snavely 2016).

Expected Beneficial Outcomes

Increased availability of nursing faculty

Evidence of Effectiveness

Offering financial incentives to nursing graduate students who agree to teach in nursing undergraduate or graduate programs is a suggested strategy to increase the number and availability of nursing faculty (McDermid 2012, Morgan 2014, Fox 2009a, Rich 2010, Allan 2008, Siela 2008). Available evidence suggests that the high cost of higher education and the salary gap between nurses working in academia and clinical settings are barriers to nurses pursuing careers as nursing faculty; the salary gap between nurses in academia and other faculty may also be a disincentive (Nardi 2013, Evans 2013, Dreifuerst 2016, Morgan 2014, McDermid 2012, Duvall 2010, Rich 2010, Fox 2009a, Siela 2008). However, financial incentives alone may not be enough to mitigate the nursing faculty shortage (McDermid 2012, Duvall 2010, Hessler 2006). Additional evidence is necessary to confirm effects, especially in the long-term (Dreifuerst 2016).

Implementation

United States

Federal funding for financial initiatives to address the nursing faculty shortage include: Title VIII of the Public Health Services Act, which funds Nursing Workforce Development Programs; Nurse Faculty Loan Programs, funded through the Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program; and the Graduate Assistance in Area of National Need for nursing programs (ANA-Title VIII, HRSA-Nurse Corps, US ED-Graduate assistance).

Philanthropic and health care groups also often contribute to scholarships and endowments (Feldman 2015); the New Jersey Nursing Initiative (NJNI), funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) (NJNI), is one example. Individual nursing schools may also establish programs such as Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing’s Grow our Own program (Grow our Own).

Wisconsin

Wisconsin’s Nursing Student Loan Program, administered by the Higher Educational Aids Board, provides loans and loan forgiveness for undergraduate, master’s, or doctoral nursing students, including those who become nursing faculty. Students are eligible for a maximum loan of $3,000 per year and $15,000 total to defray the cost of tuition, fees, and expenses. Loan forgiveness is based on the number of years recipients are employed as a licensed nurse or nurse educator in Wisconsin; up to 50% of the loan amount is eligible for forgiveness (WI HEAB-Nursing student loan). 

Implementation Resources

AACN-State policies - American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN). Policy & advocacy: State resources. Accessed on September 13, 2017
Benefits.gov - Benefits.gov. Nursing education loan repayment program. Accessed on June 6, 2016
HRSA-Loan repayment - Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). Faculty loan repayment program. Accessed on September 13, 2017
WI DHS-Primary care - Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS). Wisconsin primary care office. Accessed on September 13, 2017

Citations - Description

Allan 2008* - Allan JD, Aldebron J. A systematic assessment of strategies to address the nursing faculty shortage, US Nursing Outlook. 2008;56(6):286-97. Accessed on September 13, 2017
Snavely 2016* - Snavely TM. A brief economic analysis of the looming nursing shortage in the United States. Nursing Economics. 2016;34(2):98–100. Accessed on September 13, 2017

Citations - Evidence

Allan 2008* - Allan JD, Aldebron J. A systematic assessment of strategies to address the nursing faculty shortage, US Nursing Outlook. 2008;56(6):286-97. Accessed on September 13, 2017
Dreifuerst 2016* - Dreifuerst KT, McNelis AM, Weaver MT, et al. Exploring the pursuit of doctoral education by nurses seeking or intending to stay in faculty roles. Journal of Professional Nursing. 2016;32(3):202–212. Accessed on September 13, 2017
Duvall 2010* - Duvall JJ, Andrews DR. Using a structured review of the literature to identify key factors associated with the current nursing shortage. Journal of Professional Nursing. 2010;26(5):309-17. Accessed on September 13, 2017
Evans 2013* - Evans JD. Factors influencing recruitment and retention of nurse educators reported by current nurse faculty. Journal of Professional Nursing. 2013;29(1):11–20. Accessed on September 13, 2017
Fox 2009a* - Fox RL, Abrahamson K. A critical examination of the US nursing shortage: Contributing factors, public policy implications. Nursing Forum. 2009;44(4):235-44. Accessed on September 13, 2017
Hessler 2006* - Hessler K, Ritchie H. Recruitment and retention of novice faculty. Journal of Nursing Education. 2006;45(5):150-4. Accessed on September 13, 2017
McDermid 2012* - McDermid F, Peters K, Jackson D, Daly J. Factors contributing to the shortage of nurse faculty: A review of the literature. Nurse Education Today. 2012;32(5):565-9. Accessed on September 13, 2017
Morgan 2014* - Morgan JC, Oermann MH, Pathman DE, et al. An evaluation of state-based support-for-service programs targeting nurse faculty. Nursing Education Perspectives. 2014;35(5):280–286. Accessed on September 13, 2017
Nardi 2013* - Nardi DA, Gyurko CC. The global nursing faculty shortage: Status and solutions for change. Journal of Nursing Scholarship. 2013;45(3):317–326. Accessed on September 13, 2017
Rich 2010* - Rich KL, Nugent KE. A United States perspective on the challenges in nursing education. Nurse Education Today. 2010;30(3):228-32. Accessed on September 13, 2017
Siela 2008* - Siela D, Twibell KR, Keller V. The shortage of nurses and nursing faculty: What critical care nurses can do. AACN Advanced Critical Care. 2008;19(1):66-77. Accessed on September 13, 2017

Citations - Implementation

ANA-Title VIII - American Nurses Association (ANA). Title VIII of the Public Health Service Act: Nursing Workforce Development. Accessed on September 13, 2017
Feldman 2015* - Feldman HR, Greenberg MJ, Jaffe-Ruiz M, Kaufman SR, Cignarale S. Hitting the nursing faculty shortage head on: Strategies to recruit, retain, and develop nursing faculty. Journal of Professional Nursing. 2015;31(3):170–178. Accessed on September 13, 2017
Grow our Own - Pace University. Lienhard School of Nursing. Grow Our Own: doctoral program in nursing with the intent to become faculty upon degree completion. Accessed on September 13, 2017
HRSA-Nurse Corps - Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). Nurse Corps Loan Repayment Program, includes Nurse Faculty Loan Programs. Accessed on September 13, 2017
NJNI - New Jersey Nursing Initiative (NJNI). Support faculty development. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Accessed on September 13, 2017
US ED-Graduate assistance - US Department of Education (US ED). Graduate Assistance in Area of National Need. Accessed on September 13, 2017
WI HEAB-Nursing student loan - State of Wisconsin Higher Educational Aids Board (WI HEAB). Financial aid programs: Nursing student loan. Accessed on September 13, 2017

Page Last Updated

June 16, 2016

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