Health Behaviors Tobacco Use Diet & Exercise Alcohol & Drug Use Sexual Activity Search Policies & Programs

hints
Display All Policies & Programs

Tobacco cessation contests

Health Factors: Tobacco Use
Decision Makers: Employers & Businesses Local Government State Government Grantmakers Nonprofit Leaders Public Health Professionals & Advocates
Evidence Rating: Insufficient Evidence
Population Reach: 10-19% of WI's population
Impact on Disparities: No impact on disparities likely

Is this program or policy in use in your community? Tell us about it.

Description

In tobacco cessation contests, participants are encouraged to quit using tobacco on a particular date or during a specific time period; successful participants are eligible for raffles, lotteries, or prize drawings, which may include financial payments or other rewards. Often called Quit & Win contests, tobacco cessation contests may be part of larger cessation interventions with counseling or pharmacological treatments (e.g., nicotine replacement therapy (NRT)) (Thomas 2016). Competitions can occur at worksites or within the broader community (CG-Tobacco use).

Expected Beneficial Outcomes

Reduced tobacco consumption
Increased quit rates

Evidence of Effectiveness

There is insufficient evidence to determine whether tobacco cessation contests reduce smoking when implemented alone (CG-Tobacco use). Available evidence suggests that contests may help some smokers quit, but are not likely to affect community smoking rates (Cochrane-Cahill 2008a). Contests may be part of broader cessation programs with counseling or pharmacological treatments (Cochrane-Cahill 2014) which can decrease tobacco use in the short-term (Cochrane-Cahill 2015, Cochrane-Cahill 2014, Ledgerwood 2014); very substantial cash rewards for confirmed tobacco free participants may also decrease tobacco use in the short-term (Cochrane-Cahill 2015). An assessment of multi-component Quit & Win contests at 19 universities suggests that participation in multiple contests may increase the likelihood of quitting (Thomas 2016). However, additional evidence is needed to confirm effects.

Implementation Resources

Quit and Win - University of Minnesota. What is Quit and Win? Accessed on January 3, 2017

Citations - Description

CG-Tobacco use - The Guide to Community Preventive Services (The Community Guide). Tobacco. Accessed on May 15, 2017
Thomas 2016* - Thomas JL, Luo X, Bengtson J, et al. Enhancing Quit & Win contests to improve cessation among college smokers: A randomized clinical trial. Addiction. 2016;111(2):331-339. Accessed on January 5, 2017

Citations - Evidence

CG-Tobacco use - The Guide to Community Preventive Services (The Community Guide). Tobacco. Accessed on May 15, 2017
Cochrane-Cahill 2008a* - Cahill K, Perera R. Quit and Win contests for smoking cessation. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2008;(4):CD004986. Accessed on January 3, 2017
Cochrane-Cahill 2014* - Cahill K, Lancaster T. Workplace interventions for smoking cessation. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2014;(2):CD003440. Accessed on January 3, 2017
Cochrane-Cahill 2015* - Cahill K, Perera R. Incentives for smoking cessation. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2015;(5):CD004307. Accessed on January 3, 2017
Ledgerwood 2014 - Ledgerwood DM, Arfken CL, Petry NM, Alessi SM. Prize contingency management for smoking cessation: A randomized trial. Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2014;140:208-212. Accessed on January 5, 2017
Thomas 2016* - Thomas JL, Luo X, Bengtson J, et al. Enhancing Quit & Win contests to improve cessation among college smokers: A randomized clinical trial. Addiction. 2016;111(2):331-339. Accessed on January 5, 2017

Page Last Updated

January 5, 2017

* Journal subscription may be required for access.