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Universal school-based programs: alcohol misuse & impaired driving

Health Factors: Alcohol & Drug Use
Decision Makers: Educators
Evidence Rating: Some Evidence
Population Reach: 10-19% of WI's population
Impact on Disparities: No impact on disparities likely

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Description

Universal prevention strategies aim to deter or delay alcohol use by providing all individuals with the information and skills needed to prevent use, without screening for risk level. In the school setting, such programs can be delivered as either a specific curriculum that is part of school lessons or as a component of classroom behavior management. Universal programs can be educational, focused on raising awareness, psychosocial, focused on development of peer resistance skills, or a combination of the two (Cochrane-Foxcroft 2011).

Expected Beneficial Outcomes

Reduced excessive drinking
Reduced riding with alcohol-impaired drivers

Evidence of Effectiveness

There is some evidence that universal school-based programs reduce alcohol misuse (Cochrane-Foxcroft 2011) and alcohol-impaired riding (CG-Motor vehicle injury) among youth aged 18 and younger. Additional evidence is needed to confirm effects and determine the characteristics of the most effective programs.

Programs that target use of alcohol and other drugs as well as antisocial behavior may be more effective than programs that focus on  alcohol alone (Cochrane-Foxcroft 2011). Programs that also focus on developing peer resistance and other skills (i.e., psychosocial programs) appear more likely to have positive effects than alcohol programs alone (Cochrane-Foxcroft 2011). Universal school-based programs to reduce alcohol use that incorporate computers or the internet can also reduce alcohol use (Champion 2013).

Some programs that specifically target alcohol use reduce misuse more than a standard curriculum while others do not (Cochrane-Foxcroft 2011). Life Skills Training Program, the Unplugged program, and the Good Behavior Game are examples of universal school-based programs that have demonstrated positive effects (Cochrane-Foxcroft 2011).

Implementation Resources

LST - Botvin LifeSkills Training (LST). Program overview. Accessed on March 14, 2016
NIDA-Robertson 2003 - Robertson EB, David SL, Rao SA. Preventing drug use among children and adolescents. Bethesda: National Institutes of Health (NIH), US Department of Health and Human Services (US DHHS); 2003. Accessed on March 2, 2017
Paxis-GBG - Paxis Institute. PAX Good Behavior Game (GBG). PaxThe IOM report, and the good behavior game: Replicated proof that school failure, mental illness, crime and substance abuse are preventable from an early age. Accessed on February 1, 2016
SAMHSA-NREPP - SAMHSA's National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP). Accessed on February 9, 2017
Unplugged - Life Unplugged. Interactive program teaches students values, budgeting and working through critical life choices. Accessed on May 24, 2016

Citations - Description

Cochrane-Foxcroft 2011* - Foxcroft DR, Tsertsvadze A. Universal school-based prevention programs for alcohol misuse in young people. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2011;(5):CD009113. Accessed on December 7, 2015

Citations - Evidence

CG-Motor vehicle injury - The Guide to Community Preventive Services (The Community Guide). Motor vehicle injury prevention. Accessed on December 19, 2016
Champion 2013* - Champion KE, Newton NC, Barrett EL, Teesson M. A systematic review of school-based alcohol and other drug prevention programs facilitated by computers or the internet. Drug and Alcohol Review. 2013;32(2):115-23. Accessed on December 8, 2015
Cochrane-Foxcroft 2011* - Foxcroft DR, Tsertsvadze A. Universal school-based prevention programs for alcohol misuse in young people. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2011;(5):CD009113. Accessed on December 7, 2015

Page Last Updated

May 29, 2013

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