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Mass media campaigns against underage & binge drinking

Health Factors: Alcohol & Drug Use
Decision Makers: Community Members Grantmakers Healthcare Professionals & Advocates Public Health Professionals & Advocates
Evidence Rating: Expert Opinion
Population Reach: 50-99% of WI's population
Impact on Disparities: Likely to increase disparities

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Description

Mass media campaigns utilize television, radio, print, and social media to increase adult awareness of underage drinking and its consequences. Campaigns may also include efforts to provide adults with the knowledge and skills to take actions that help prevent underage drinking (IOM-Underage drinking 2004SAMHSA-Talk).

Expected Beneficial Outcomes

Reduced underage drinking
Reduced excessive drinking
Increased adult awareness of underage drinking

Evidence of Effectiveness

Mass media campaigns that increase adult awareness of underage drinking and its consequences are a suggested strategy to reduce underage drinking and excessive drinking among youth (IOM-Underage drinking 2004). Available evidence suggests that national media campaigns effectively disseminate information; in general, campaigns may be more effective when paired with enforcement efforts. However, additional evidence is needed to confirm effects of increased parental knowledge on their behavior regarding alcohol (IOM-Underage drinking 2004).

Implementation

United States

There are a variety of mass media interventions implemented throughout the country. Some examples include, Talk. They Hear You. (SAMHSA-Talk), Parents Who Host, Lose the Most (DFAA-Parents who host), Alcohol: True Stories (ATS), and ModerateDrinking.com (MD).

Implementation Resources

SAMHSA-Talk - Underage Drinking Prevention. Talk. They Hear You. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). 2014. Accessed on January 28, 2016

Citations - Description

IOM-Underage drinking 2004 - Institute of Medicine (IOM), National Research Council (NRC), Committee on Developing a Strategy to Reduce and Prevent Underage Drinking, Board on Children, Youth, and Families (BCYF). Reducing underage drinking: A collective responsibility. (Bonnie RJ, O’Connell ME, eds.). Washington, DC: National Academies Press; 2004. Accessed on May 16, 2017
SAMHSA-Talk - Underage Drinking Prevention. Talk. They Hear You. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). 2014. Accessed on January 28, 2016

Citations - Evidence

IOM-Underage drinking 2004 - Institute of Medicine (IOM), National Research Council (NRC), Committee on Developing a Strategy to Reduce and Prevent Underage Drinking, Board on Children, Youth, and Families (BCYF). Reducing underage drinking: A collective responsibility. (Bonnie RJ, O’Connell ME, eds.). Washington, DC: National Academies Press; 2004. Accessed on May 16, 2017

Citations - Implementation

ATS - Family Health Productions. Alcohol: True stories discussion guide. Gloucester: Family Health Productions; 2003. Accessed on December 7, 2015
DFAA-Parents who host - Drug Free Action Alliance (DFAA). Parents who host, lose the most: Don’t be a party to teenage drinking. Accessed on December 15, 2015
MD - Moderate Drinking. Accessed on March 14, 2016
SAMHSA-Talk - Underage Drinking Prevention. Talk. They Hear You. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). 2014. Accessed on January 28, 2016

Page Last Updated

September 5, 2014