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Overservice law enforcement initiatives

Health Factors: Alcohol & Drug Use
Decision Makers: Local Government State Government Federal Government
Evidence Rating: Insufficient Evidence
Population Reach: 50-99% of WI's population
Impact on Disparities: No impact on disparities likely

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Description

Overservice law enforcement initiatives are proactive community efforts to increase enforcement of laws prohibiting alcoholic beverage service to intoxicated customers. Such enforcement efforts are carried out by Alcohol Beverage Control personnel or plainclothes or uniformed police and may include fines or licensing actions. Alcohol beverage outlets are often informed of enforcement plans, and managers and staff are often provided with education and training in strategies to prevent overservice (CG-Alcohol).

Expected Beneficial Outcomes

Reduced excessive drinking
Reduced alcohol-related harms
Improved alcohol server practices
Reduced impaired driving

Evidence of Effectiveness

There is insufficient evidence to determine whether overservice law enforcement initiatives reduce excessive alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harms (CG-Alcohol). Available evidence suggests that such efforts can reduce service to intoxicated customers and reduce alcohol impaired driving, particularly when implemented in areas at high-risk for excessive use (CG-Alcohol, Jones 2011a). However, additional evidence is needed to confirm effects.

Citations - Description

CG-Alcohol - The Guide to Community Preventive Services (The Community Guide). Excessive alcohol consumption. Accessed on December 19, 2016

Citations - Evidence

CG-Alcohol - The Guide to Community Preventive Services (The Community Guide). Excessive alcohol consumption. Accessed on December 19, 2016
Jones 2011a* - Jones L, Hughes K, Atkinson AM, Bellis MA. Reducing harm in drinking environments: A systematic review of effective approaches. Health & Place. 2011;17(2):508-18. Accessed on March 14, 2016

Page Last Updated

May 29, 2013

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