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Job-sharing programs

Health Factors: Employment
Decision Makers: Employers & Businesses
Evidence Rating: Insufficient Evidence
Population Reach: 50-99% of WI's population
Impact on Disparities: No impact on disparities likely

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Description

Job-sharing is part-time employment in which the schedules of two part-time employees are arranged to cover the duties of a single full-time position.

Expected Beneficial Outcomes

Increased employment

Evidence of Effectiveness

There is insufficient evidence to determine whether job-sharing increases employment. Available evidence suggests that job-sharing programs appear to have a negligible impact on unemployment rates overall (Roche 1996). Such programs may also be associated with increased turnover (Stavrou 2010). Job-sharing is a suggested strategy to allow older workers to transition from full-time to part-time employment without retiring (Urban-Eyster 2008).

Implementation

United States

Examples of organizations and programs that support job sharing include: Abbott, Lancaster Labs, and the Unified School District of Wichita, Kansas (Urban-Eyster 2008).

Citations - Evidence

Roche 1996* - Roche WK, Fynes B, Morrissey T. Working time and employment: A review of international evidence. International Labour Review. 1996;135(2):129-57. Accessed on May 20, 2016
Stavrou 2010* - Stavrou E, Kilaniotis C. Flexible work and turnover: An empirical investigation across cultures. British Journal of Management. 2010;21(2):541-54. Accessed on November 9, 2015
Urban-Eyster 2008 - Eyster L, Johnson RW, Toder E. Current strategies to employ and retain older workers. Washington, DC: Urban Institute; 2008. Accessed on May 20, 2016

Citations - Implementation

Urban-Eyster 2008 - Eyster L, Johnson RW, Toder E. Current strategies to employ and retain older workers. Washington, DC: Urban Institute; 2008. Accessed on May 20, 2016

Page Last Updated

April 18, 2013

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